The Storm and the Darkness- Synopsis

lighthouse-in-stormWith July 1 looming as my projected publishing date for The Storm and the Darkness, I realized it was time to stop putting off updating the synopsis. The one I had was too detailed, and a bit sloppy. So I’ve created two versions; one for this site, Amazon, and other sites that may feature the book, and one for the back of the book.

I’m posting them both here, and welcome any feedback on either!

Shorter Blurb (Book Cover)

(Special thanks to Jennifer Stevens for helping me on this one)

Ana Deschanel has made a terrible mistake. The only chance of protecting the other people involved is to flee New Orleans, the only home she has ever known, for the quiet solitude of Summer Island.

Summer Island, Maine (population 202) is not the tranquil escape Ana imagined. The locals are distant and cold, especially her neighbor, the reclusive veterinarian Jonathan St. Andrews. Her only lifeline is the kind but odd caretaker Alex Whitman. Showing up at all the right moments, he warns her she is completely unprepared for a Maine winter. As the first winter storm approaches to whispers of an island shutdown- Ana realizes that she may soon be cut off from the rest of the world.

After a surprising encounter with Jonathan’s brother, Finn, Ana finds herself braving the storm to return something to him. Unprepared for the Maine storm, she slips and falls onto the jagged rocks along the shore. The St. Andrews brothers find her in the nick of time, but she remains unconscious. As the storm worsens, the St. Andrews brothers learn there are other, more sinister forces at work closer than they ever imagined.

With no help from the outside world, they must find a way to protect themselves from both the storm, and the growing darkness that looms across the island.

Longer Synopsis

Ana Deschanel has made a terrible mistake. In one singular and desperate lapse in judgment, she put everything- and everyone- she cares about in jeopardy. She knows the only chance of protecting the other people involved is to leave town, so she flees New Orleans, the only home she has ever known, for the quiet solitude of an old Victorian on the shore of Summer Island, Maine.

But Summer Island, population 202, is not the tranquil escape Ana imagined. The locals are distant and cold, including her neighbor, the reclusive veterinarian Jonathan St. Andrews. Calls home to her best friend and cousin Nicolas only leave her feeling an empty sense of regret at what she left behind. Her only lifeline is the kind, but odd, caretaker Alex Whitman, who continues to show up at all the right moments, reminding her that she is completely unprepared. As the first winter storm approaches- amidst whispers of an island shutdown- Ana is struck with the realization that she may soon be cut off from the rest of the world.

After a surprising, but charming encounter with Jonathan’s brother, Finn, Ana finds herself braving the storm to return something important to him. Along the way she has a terrible accident, slipping and falling onto the jagged rocks along the shore. The St. Andrews brothers find her in the nick of time, and work to save her life, but she remains unconscious as the storm rages outside. Back home, Nicolas begins to worry when he hasn’t heard from Ana, and he enlists the help of his friend Oz to investigate the situation.

As the storm worsens, the St. Andrews brothers learn that there are other, more sinister forces at work, involving someone they have known their whole lives who is harboring a dark secret. With no help from the outside world, they must find a way to protect themselves from both the storm, and the growing darkness that looms across the island.

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21 thoughts on “The Storm and the Darkness- Synopsis

    1. Thank you! It’s so challenging to capture the essence of the story, summarize it, and make it sound as interesting possible in a short space. If you think the book sounds good, then this was successful 🙂

  1. Both synopsis (synopses ?) work well, but if I have to pick one, it would be the shorter version. It gives me just enough info to intrigue me and want me to read more (like the novel itself). 🙂

    1. Thank you! 🙂 That’s likely the one I will use for most things. I appreciate the feedback…its so hard for a writer to put themselves in the reader’s shoes when its regarding their own work.

    1. Thanks! This has to be the least fun element of writing for me. If there’s any point in the process I could wave a magic wand and have something appear, this would be it!

    1. Same here, Charles. While I prefer writing a longer one, I prefer reading a shorter one. I think this is why getting reader feedback is so essential. We wear two different hats as a writer and a reader, and they feel nearly impossible to wear at the same time.

  2. You had me with the photo – terrific. And I think I prefer the short version. There are a lot of people to remember in this short text, so I think I would cut out the caretaker and stick with the brothers first names only (just here in the synopsis) rather than later referring to them as the St. Andrews brothers. I’m very curious about what the something is that Finn left behind. I’m guessing it has some upcoming importance relating to the sinister forces facing the brothers?

    1. Thank you! I found the photo online, but its similar to the one I gave my cover designer to use. I can’t wait to see what he comes up with.

      The thing Finn left behind has no significant relevance on its own, but its the catalyst for the remaining events in the book.

      Thank you for the feedback…and I’m glad to see it peaked your curiosity!

  3. I love the shorter version. It is intriguing without being too revealing. You have a wonderful way with words. I can empathize with the challenge of writing your own. You are bound by space constraints, yet have to find a way to tell enough. I am currently involved in revising my descriptions. I did not seek guidance before publishing. You are very wise. My publisher requires a 400 character book description for sites like Barnes and Noble which don’t permit anything but a brief overview. Very difficult to condense over a half million characters into 400.

    1. Oh, I completely understand. The first time around I had my friend write it because, no matter how hard I tried, I could not summarize my book. She did a lovely job, but then, when I did more research about how to write a powerful synopsis, I realized that we had been doing it wrong all along. Its truly a unique form of art to summarize without taking away from the story and in a way that intrigues others. In a lot of ways, I think its harder than writing the book. Thank you so much for the feedback and good luck with yours!!

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